Chuck E. Cheese was an orphan who didn't know his birthday

Chuck E. Cheese was an orphan who didn't know his birthday

The story opens by explaining that young Chuck grew up in an orphanage called St. Marinara's, thus setting the stage for his pizza-loving personality to develop.Still loves birthday parties, pizza and music!"

Short Bursts of Exercise May Prime the Brain for Learning

Short Bursts of Exercise May Prime the Brain for Learning

For the next phase of this research, Westbrook and colleagues at OHSU plan to couple specific learning tasks with acute bouts of aerobic exercise in an attempt to better understand how triggering exercise-induced Mtss1L may prime the brain for learning.

Exercise May Change Sperm in Ways That Benefit Babies Brains

Exercise May Change Sperm in Ways That Benefit Babies Brains

Putting soon-to-be mouse fathers on a six-week exercise regimen before procreating resulted in mice offspring with better brain structure and function than mice born from the sperm of an inactive father, according to a new study.

Developing Your Gut-Brain Axis: The First Thousand Days

Developing Your Gut-Brain Axis: The First Thousand Days

These cells play a role in the communication between the microbiota and the brain, via the vagus nerve, and they help to develop the mucus layer in your gut. In germ-free mice, myelin develops abnormally, implying that microbes are important for properly insulating your growing brain.

Exercising Your Brain Could Make Your Unborn Kids Smarter

Exercising Your Brain Could Make Your Unborn Kids Smarter

But Dr. Evgenia Kalogeraki and colleagues of Gottingen University, writing in the January 2019 issue of E-neuro, have now shown in mice that giving the young enriched sensory and motor experiences actually confers the benefits of early enrichment on their unborn progeny, regardless of whether those offspring have enriched sensorimotor experiences of their own.

From Mom on Your Birthday: A Microbiota

From Mom on Your Birthday: A Microbiota

Source: Olha Rohulya/iStock When a baby is squeezed down the birth canal, we know that it picks up vaginal microbes along the way.

Schizophrenia and the Gut

Schizophrenia and the Gut

This means the researchers were able to transfer the symptoms of schizophrenia to mice using only the gut bacteria of a schizophrenic subject.

How Men and Women Process Fear Memories

How Men and Women Process Fear Memories

They suggest that regulation of a gene called Cdk5 is an important source of the difference in the way males and females process fear memories. Using a novel technique called epigenetic editing, Dr. Heller and colleagues were able to discover a female-specific role of Cdk5 activation in weakening the retrieval of fear memories.

Neuroscientists Discover a New Brain Reward System

Neuroscientists Discover a New Brain Reward System

In mice that were not trained in the whisker-task, the water reward did not fire the somatosensory dendrites. Dr. Bruno reasons that a yet-to-be-discovered neuromodulator in the somatosensory cortex functions in a similar manner to dopamine in other areas of the brain’s reward learning system.

Exercise-Linked Irisin May Protect Against Neurodegeneration

Exercise-Linked Irisin May Protect Against Neurodegeneration

Source: Sergey Nivens/Shutterstock The recent study by first author Mychael Lourenco et al., “ Exercise-Linked FNDC5/Irisin Rescues Synaptic Plasticity and Memory Defects in Alzheimer’s Models ,” adds to a growing body of evidence that exercise-induced irisin may protect against neurodegeneration and boost memory in both humans and mice.

Stanford Neuroscientists May Revolutionize Pain Management

Stanford Neuroscientists May Revolutionize Pain Management

The Stanford researchers sought to discover the neurons responsible for the emotional experience of pain. Using a combination of brain-imaging and molecular testing, the researchers discovered a group of cells in the amygdala that serves as an on-off switch to pain aversion in laboratory mice.

Serotonin Plays a Surprising Role in Fight-Flight-or-Freeze

Serotonin Plays a Surprising Role in Fight-Flight-or-Freeze

Discussion of Fight-Flight-or-Freeze Responses Based on a Combination of Life Experience and Empirical Evidence Yesterday afternoon, I wrote a post, "Exercise May Promote Gene Expression of Feel-Good Chemicals" based on new research from McMaster University ( Allison et al., 2019 ), which found that the combination of vigorous aerobic exercise and weight-lifting caused a chain reaction along the kynurenine pathway that resulted in the synthesis of more serotonin and a decreased depression risk.

The Neuroscience of "Rock-a-Bye Baby" and Rocking Adult Beds

The Neuroscience of "Rock-a-Bye Baby" and Rocking Adult Beds

The gentle and continuous rocking motion of the bed used by sleep researchers at the University of Geneva helped to synchronize neural activity between thalamo-cortical networks of the brain, which the researchers believe play an important role in boosting memory consolidation.

What Can A Lizard Tell Us About Mental Health?

What Can A Lizard Tell Us About Mental Health?

In the lizard study, researchers from Pennsylvania State University exposed young lizards to fire ants (a natural stressor) and compared stress levels to unexposed lizards. The children of parents who experienced WWII trauma showed genetic changes and a greater risk of stress disorders.

Sweet 2-year-old starstruck meeting Mickey Mouse

Sweet 2-year-old starstruck meeting Mickey Mouse

Sweet 2-year-old starstruck meeting Mickey Mouse copied! An adorable 2-year-old was just a little bit starstruck meeting her favorite character, Mickey Mouse, on a birthday trip to a Disney amusement park. TODAY’s Hoda Kotb has the Morning Boost. Read More

Mice, and Perhaps Canines and Other Animals, Can Track Time

Mice, and Perhaps Canines and Other Animals, Can Track Time

Because of my long-term interests in whether or not animals have a sense of time, I was especially please to see a very important and novel study on mice published in Nature Neuroscience called "Evidence for a subcircuit in medial entorhinal cortex representing elapsed time during immobility" by Northwestern University researchers James Heys and Daniel Dombeck.

How Parenting Is Hard-Wired

How Parenting Is Hard-Wired

Now, a report just published in Nature gives us the first ever look at the inner workings of a brain-wide circuit orchestrating parenting behavior. Our hypothesis was that different brain areas are in charge of particular aspects of parenting.