Give Your Graduates the Gift of Financial Know-how

Give Your Graduates the Gift of Financial Know-how

As the school year comes to a close, all of us who are parents start wondering if our children are ready for the next chapter in their lives, especially if it’s one of those pivotal years when we’re about to watch them receive a diploma.

Life as Art

Life as Art

The aging brain resembles the creative brain in several ways. These changes in the aging brain may make it ideally suited to accomplish work in a number of creative domains.

A New Way of Looking at the Personality of the Bragger

A New Way of Looking at the Personality of the Bragger

The three components of personality test bragging, then, include social desirability, overclaiming, and overconfidence which, as noted by the authors, form a “nomological network” reflecting a general positivity bias.

Creating a Knowledge-Sharing Culture at Work

Creating a Knowledge-Sharing Culture at Work

Past research shows that being too busy (work overload) and competition between workers can stop people from sharing knowledge. How can you create a work environment where ‘sharing is caring’ and where employees are more likely to share information than hoard it?

Management Lessons from the National Hockey League

Management Lessons from the National Hockey League

My colleagues Aaron Schmidt, Michael Natali, and I studied the success of National Hockey League (NHL) teams across five seasons. Adjusting top-player time-on-ice to meet the demands of the situation resulted in higher season-level points.

Become an Influencer

Become an Influencer

Becoming an influencer rather than the family authority, takes time and patience, but is quite important for the overall health of your relationship and for getting what you want from your partner.

Littlewoods retailer survey finds mothers asked 228 questions a day

Littlewoods retailer survey finds mothers asked 228 questions a day

Girls aged four are the most curious, asking 390 questions per day - averaging a question every one minute 56 seconds of their waking day, Daily Mail reported. The research found the number of questions asked by children differs with age and gender, with four-year-old girls being the most inquisitive.

Why People Take Shortcuts

Why People Take Shortcuts

Parents who committed bribery were able to take shortcuts of their own and likely circumvented many years of beneficial study sessions and support activities with their children. While it is obvious that neither parents nor university admission departments should ever reinforce cheating, that is not the bigger issue here.

EEG Marker Found to Predict Long-term Learning

EEG Marker Found to Predict Long-term Learning

Source: Andrew Budson We recorded ERPs on medical students taking anatomy for the first time, measuring their responses to anatomical terms at three times: prior to the course, right at the end of the course, and—importantly—6 months later.

Understanding Understanding: Could an A.I. Cook Meth?

Understanding Understanding: Could an A.I. Cook Meth?

It certainly demands knowledge of the causal relations at the level of operation one is aiming to control, though it is possible to achieve without a deeper understanding of the underlying principles at play.

Why Have Overdose Rates Risen for Middle-Aged Women?

Why Have Overdose Rates Risen for Middle-Aged Women?

Furthermore, consistent with weight concerns, women are increasingly using drugs that lead to increased mood and decreased appetite. Although this is often not the stereotypical demographic we picture when we think of “drug addicts,” middle-aged women are increasingly using drugs, in part because of body weight and shape concerns.

9 Signs You May Be a Cognitive Miser

9 Signs You May Be a Cognitive Miser

An article in Scholastic revealed the following statistic: While almost nine in 10 parents of children ages 6–17 (86 percent) say it is extremely or very important for their child to read books for fun, less than half of kids (46 percent) say the same.

Brain Words: A Solution for America’s Reading Problem

Brain Words: A Solution for America’s Reading Problem

Moreover a fact still ignored by educators is that a great deal of research supports the use of standalone spelling books for delivering a deep level of spelling knowledge aka brain words (Wallace, 2006).

When Worlds Collide

When Worlds Collide

More thought, money, and passion have gone into sharing knowledge with possible extraterrestrials in deep space than to our own fellow humans who are right here living beside us.

Foes of Genetically Modified Foods Know Less Than They Think

Foes of Genetically Modified Foods Know Less Than They Think

Source: Pixabay The strongest opponents of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) seem to think they know more than others about genes and food science while actually knowing less.

How Culture Makes Us Smarter

How Culture Makes Us Smarter

Cumulative culture doesn’t just gift our species technology that none of us could have invented; it literally makes us smarter.

The Power of Prime

The Power of Prime

Always entertaining, frequently thought provoking, sometimes controversial, and occasionally outrageous, I want The Power of Prime to be a place for readers to go where, after reading my posts, will say, "Mmmm, that was interesting."

What Does It Mean to Be Knowledgeable About Your Finances?

What Does It Mean to Be Knowledgeable About Your Finances?

When financial knowledge is studied by social scientists, most often they are referring to the individual’s financial literacy, which is knowledge about basic personal finance concepts such as interest, compounding, and risk, with respect to borrowing, saving, and investing decisions.

Understanding Bias and Prejudice—And Violence

Understanding Bias and Prejudice—And Violence

Infant research shows that humans are programmed to: generalize and predict, based on experience (by the way, this is what transference is all about in psychotherapy and psychoanalysis); look for cause and effect patterns; internalize the worldview of those around them; be attracted to novelty; feel fear and distress if stimuli occur too fast or are too much, respectively.

Should 16- and 17-Year-Olds Be Able to Vote?

Should 16- and 17-Year-Olds Be Able to Vote?

Indeed, classrooms that allow youth to cast “mock votes” have teens with higher civic knowledge and intentions to vote in the future (Meirick & Wackman, 2004), and research on Austrian youth shows that lowering the voting age to 16 increased youth political interest (Zeglovits & Zandonella, 2013).