What Signal Does a Beard Send?

What Signal Does a Beard Send?

Again, employing a similar experimental design, the researchers asked 450 participants to rate the faces used in the first experiment (clean-shaven men displaying happiness, clean-shaven men displaying anger, bearded men displaying happiness, and bearded men displaying anger) on measures of aggressiveness, masculinity, and prosociality.

Are Cheaters Hypocrites?

Are Cheaters Hypocrites?

As certain personality styles, like narcissism and psychopathy, are thought to be characterized by an inflated view of oneself, egocentrism, and lack of empathy for the impact of one’s bad behavior on others, it was hypothesized that high narcissism and psychopathy would result in greater self-serving bias and greater sexual hypocrisy.

The Fear of Regret and Its Consequences

The Fear of Regret and Its Consequences

People who suffer from high degrees of neuroticism, for example, are more likely to feel regret than others. This means that the tendency to feel regret is linked with the experience of anger, fear, and loneliness.

Outsmart the Anchoring Bias in Three Simple Steps

Outsmart the Anchoring Bias in Three Simple Steps

Anchoring can represent just such a bias: It refers to the automatic process of identifying available information to provide a focal point or a baseline for our judgement.

Is Optimism Ever Unhealthy?

Is Optimism Ever Unhealthy?

Next time you’re at a dinner party, try the following experiment: Ask people to raise their hands to indicate whether they believe they’re at greater risk, equal risk, or less risk than the average person of their same age, gender, and background for virtually any common negative event, from having a heart attack to being mugged.

Virtual Justice: How Big Data Could Undermine Society

Virtual Justice: How Big Data Could Undermine Society

The researcher who documented systematic discrimination in facial-recognition systems, Joy Buolamwini, launched the Algorithmic Justice League to do just that.

Risky Decisions Reflect a Tug of War in the Brain

Risky Decisions Reflect a Tug of War in the Brain

“Right hemisphere is pushing you to take the bet, take the risk, and left hemisphere is pulling you away from that,” Sarma says.

The Psychological Science of Taking Friendlier Selfies

The Psychological Science of Taking Friendlier Selfies

Source: Courtesy of Nicolas Davidenko A slight tilt of the head to the left or right makes human beings—including an image of the Mona Lisa—and other species less off-putting and more approachable by focusing attention to the upper eye, according to a new study by researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz.

What do YouTube Kids and Class Dojo have in common?

What do YouTube Kids and Class Dojo have in common?

As more and more developers are perfecting their learning analytics, classroom management systems, and personalized reading recommendations, let us think critically about the wider assumptions underlying the current design of algorithms.

How to Make Decisions You'll Still Love in Ten Years

How to Make Decisions You'll Still Love in Ten Years

Though all of those behaviors (devotion, dedication, etc.) sound like absolute virtues, they aren’t when they’re in support of the monster, right? By your standards, loyalty to the saint is good, resistance to the saint is bad. Enemies of good people are bad.

Understanding Bias and Prejudice—And Violence

Understanding Bias and Prejudice—And Violence

Infant research shows that humans are programmed to: generalize and predict, based on experience (by the way, this is what transference is all about in psychotherapy and psychoanalysis); look for cause and effect patterns; internalize the worldview of those around them; be attracted to novelty; feel fear and distress if stimuli occur too fast or are too much, respectively.

5 Ways to Stop Yourself From Jumping to Conclusions

5 Ways to Stop Yourself From Jumping to Conclusions

You might be surprised to learn that the cognitive tendency of jumping to conclusions, abbreviated as “JTC,” is implicated in social anxiety and delusional disorders in what researchers call the “Threat Anticipation Model.” In new research by University of East Anglia (UK)’s James Hurley and colleagues (2018), JTC interpretation bias is tested as a process that leads people to assume, wrongly, that a situation presents them with physical, social, or psychological harm.

Leadership Lessons from Donald Trump

Leadership Lessons from Donald Trump

President Trump uses more of the “sink or swim” type of leadership, what is referred to as “management-by-exception.” This type of leader allows followers to take on responsibilities, but only intervenes to correct poor performance.

Why We Should Not Be Impressed by Eerie Coincidences

Why We Should Not Be Impressed by Eerie Coincidences

One of them, which we’ll consider here, is hindsight bias: you’re judging the probability of the event after the fact, pondering the odds backwards.

Protective Instincts

Protective Instincts

When mothers hold their babies, they are much more likely to cradle young infants on the left side than on the right. The bias to hold on the left is still apparent when babies are positioned where heart sounds are not accessible, for example, when their head is on mother’s shoulder or in the crook of her arm.