New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has interview with The Project

The New Zealand Prime Minister has revealed she's had little family time since the attack.

Follow Jacinda Ardern's journey from Mormon, to DJ, to policy advisor, to Prime Minister. Find out what influenced one of the world's most inspirational leaders.

How Jacinda Ardern became the world's most inspirational leader 00:40:57

New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern is the leader every country wants and needs.

In the wake of the horrific Christchurch mosque massacre she comforted her country with compassion and led her government with conviction.

The 38-year-old embraced her nation’s people with generous hugs and made sure all of the 50 victims’ funerals were partly paid for and promised to support the victims’ families for as long as they needed.

The brave leader was swift to take action to avoid another terrible crime by banning all military-style, semi-automatic weapons and today announced a Royal Commission into the attack to investigate what could have been done to prevent it.

Her actions have been applauded around the world after only entering the role of prime minister 18 months ago.

Tackle fears with common sense. If she's scared of dogs, don't hustle her across the street when one is coming. Demystify the fear. ("Oh, a puppy! Let's ask the owner if we can feel how soft his fur is.") In tense moments—shots come to mind—be sympathetic but not too emotional, says Atlanta-area pediatrician Roy Benaroch. Say, "It will be OK. It will be over in a few minutes," not, "I know—it hurts! It hurts!"

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Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern hugs a mosque-goer in Wellington, New Zealand after the terror attack. Source: Getty Images.

Jacinda is a new mum

What is also important to remember is that Jacinda has led her country in this impressive style at the same time as entering another important job - motherhood.

She and partner Clarke Gayford welcomed their first child, a daughter Neve, in June last year.

In the first year of a baby’s life, most mums are just trying to keep their heads above water. For Jacinda she has stood on a world stage to represent her country during its saddest period with inspiring self-assurance all before her first baby turns one.

Tonight, The Project host Waleed Aly sat down with Jacinda in her only Australian interview since the horrific mosque massacre in Christchurch and she gave a glimpse into how she's juggling both public and private life.

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Jacinda and her partner Clarke Gayford welcomed their first baby in 2018. Source: AAP

She hasn't had much family time

When Waleed asked her if she had spent time with her family since the March 15 attack she replied, "not much", and explained her parents had been helping with her nine-month-old daughter Neve.

Related: The Real Joys of Being a Mom

"Right now my time with them probably wouldn't be quality, because I feel such a draw to be focused on doing what's needed for those who have lost loved ones," she says.

"My family have come to me, we're a family friendly environment, family have visited me in the beehive when they can."

"I'm the last one that anyone should be worrying about."

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Jacinda has been a brave and comforting face since the Christchurch attack. Source: Getty

"I feel things deeply"

Jacinda also explained that becoming a mother had "almost certainly" affected how she works and feels as a leader.

"It's probably hard to analyse how you are changed by parenthood, but you feel it, and your response and empathy, and certainly when I visited with families, seen husbands, wives, hospitals and the grief surrounding that and fear, and you feel that deeply," she said.

"I've always been a person inclined to feel things quite deeply."

The PM described her decision to wear a hijab following the attack - an image which has been shared around the world - was something she gave little thought to but learned gave women a sense of security.

Katie Holmes (mom to daughter Suri): “I’ve never met a 2-year-old who is terrible. I’m so cool with every stage my daughter goes through. I just think she’s amazing. I hope she’s not looking at me thinking, Mom, are the terrible 30s coming on with you?”

"If wearing the hijab gave them a sense of security to continue to practise their faith then I feel very pleased I did it. My job is to make feel people safe, the fact people do not, is very distressing," she said.

She also thanked Australia for its support, which she has felt "acutely"

"Our job is to share love and support for our muslim communities around the world," she said.