'My mother-in-law has been feeding my baby behind my back'

She even went as far as criticising the new mum for wanting to follow guidelines, saying a baby "isn't a science project." How would you respond?

Your baby will grow and learn A LOT in the first 18 months. Here’s a guide to their major physical milestones.

Making decisions to do with your baby can be difficult. But at the end of the day, the big ones, like when to start solids and when to transition from the cot to a bed, are decisions for the parents to make.

In fact, many would be quite annoyed to discover a third party had come along and taken such a big decision away from them without even telling them about it.

That is what happened to one mum, who has posted to Mumsnet about her mother-in-law who has been feeding her six-month-old daughter behind her back.

Image: iStock.

When someone cares for your child, you're trusting them to also follow your wishes on the big things. Image: iStock.

"I’ve been waiting until I thought she was ready"

"I would like your honest opinion on how you would react or cope with someone feeding your baby before you have started or wanted to start weaning your baby yourself," the woman wrote in her post.

"My baby's first food was a rusk and she’s been being fed rusks for the last five weeks without me knowing.

Encourage your child to be careful when disclosing personal information. A simple rule for younger children should be that the child should not give out their name, phone number or photo without your approval. Older children using social networking sites like Facebook should be encouraged to be selective about what personal information and photos they post to online spaces. Regardless of privacy settings, once material is online you can no longer control who sees it or how it is used.

"My baby has just turned six months old and I’ve been waiting until I thought she was ready or if not until she turned six months."

So imagine you've been waiting for those signs that your baby's ready, to discover she's been chowing down on rusks for the last month. All those cute photo opportunities of her sucking on those bland little sticks have passed you by.

And most importantly, you've missed it all. You weren't there to see her eyes light up and her chubby little fingers grasping for more as she jams it into her tiny little mouth.

Image: iStock.

Would you be annoyed too? Image: iStock.

"She knows it's wrong"

People on Mumsnet agreed the older woman crossed the line.

"If she's done it behind your back, not told you she was doing it, then she knows it's wrong. I would be furious," replied one person.

"I’d also be really angry," added another. "Not on at all. The current guidelines say no solids before six months because of the ways babies' stomachs digest."

Another pointed out it's not just about following guidelines, but it can be a sentimental thing for many parents:

Try to always be the adult you claim to be and have the emotional self-control to offer firm guidance, support and moral leadership. Sympathise with them but try not to solve their problems for them.

"I’d be furious. Just as much for sentimental reasons as much as anything. You wanted that precious first time of feeding your baby and it’s been taken away from you. Opinions change as to when is the best time to start introducing solid foods but that decision in respect of your baby was up to you. That person would not have baby by themselves again for a long time and I would tell them why."

"My baby 'isn’t a science project'"

The mum later added that her partner was not backing her up on this and her mother-in-law visited her when he wasn't there to discuss what had happened:

"His mum came round to be confrontational without him there and asked do I think she’s trying to hurt the baby and that my baby isn’t a science project because I had said everything I have read or been told is to wait until six months because it’s better for the baby.

"Rusks have the equivalent sugar wise as a jam doughnut I didn't want that being my baby's first food nor would I feed her them."

The new mum clearly needs a more supportive partner to help her through this. What do you think? Should a parent ever have to make a point of asking people not to feed their own child?

Always tell the truth. It's how you want your child to behave, right?