'My friend returns my gifts for cash'

Is this behaviour unacceptable, or does this fall under fair gift etiquette?

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Gift etiquette is pretty simple. A present should be something given, never expected, and the recipient should express gratitude. That's it.

Sadly for one woman (and most likely parents everywhere at some point in time), some gifts she has purchased and gone to the effort of posting to some children in her family, have resulted in none of the above-unspoken rules being followed.

"Return said gifts and give them the money"

In a post to parenting forum, Mumsnet , the woman said she bought some gifts for no specific reason, for two children within her family.

"I bought them because I thought they were cute and the kids would like them," she wrote.

So she sent them via the mail and asked their parent to confirm their arrival.

"The parent confirmed they had arrived but asked me to return said gifts and give them (the parent) the money instead as that would be more useful," wrote the woman, who asked if they are being ungrateful or if she's just being precious.

Normal rules apply. Discipline the child who stutters just as you do your other children and just as you would if he didn’t stutter.

Image: iStock.

Image: iStock.

"Unbelievably bad form"

While a few people expressed their annoyance at having their homes filled with too many 'things', most considered this absolute poor form on the mother's part.

"It's unbelievably rude of them," said one person.

"That is unbelievably bad form, in my opinion," added another. "Ungrateful, rude and entitled - what has happened to people!"

One said not to even engage with the mother: "Don't indulge this, engage backbone. If you want to send anything further then a book on manners will suffice."

One said, "'Thank you so much for thinking of the children' is the only suitable response."

The woman did add that the gifts were for no real occasion, but she bought them as she remembered the kids commenting that they were something they liked. She said her response was just "wow" but admitted she was considering just sending them the money and letting the kids keep the gifts.

But as she said, if she were to do that, she would be "a sad old pushover."

What do you think? Is there ever a reasonable time to request a refund on gifts, or do you teach your children to smile and say thank you even they don't like it?

Remember that discipline is not punishment. Enforcing limits is really about teaching kids how to behave in the world and helping them to become competent, caring, and in control.