Get hip to all the slang words and phrases your kids are using and what they mean, okurrr

Share This Story!

Let friends in your social network know what you are reading about

LinkedIn Pinterest

Get hip to all the slang words and phrases your kids are using and what they mean, okurrr

It's hard to keep up with every new word teens are saying these days, so we've compiled a list of popular slang terms and what they mean.

Loading…Post to Facebook

Sent!

A link has been sent to your friend's email address.

Posted!

A link has been posted to your Facebook feed.

Join the Nation's Conversation

To find out more about Facebook commenting please read the Conversation Guidelines and FAQs

This conversation is moderated according to USA TODAY's community rules. Please read the rules before joining the discussion.

 logo
  • Parenting
  • Money
  • Health-Safety

Gossip about your kids. Fact: What we overhear is far more potent than what we are told directly. Make praise more effective by letting your child "catch" you whispering a compliment about him to Grandma, Dad, or even his teddy.

Rasha Ali, USA TODAY Published 11:02 a.m. ET Feb. 6, 2019 | Updated 12:01 p.m. ET Feb. 6, 2019
facebook sharetwitter shareemail shareemail share
CLOSE

Is being 'sus' a good thing? What about 'thirsty'? These teens talk us through the words and slang your teens may be using. Jennifer Jolly, special for USA TODAY

Getting older comes with a lot of side effects from going to bed before 10 p.m. to not being hip (see below) to words kids and teens are using these days.

The days of "TBH" (to be honest) and "OMG" (oh my god) are long over; they've now moved on to bigger and better lingo like "flewed" and "no cap" (see below). Those darn kids and their slang.

Don't trip (see below) though, we got you, fam (see below). Check out the list of popular slang terms below to see what they mean and to get a better understanding of what your kids are saying.

Caution: Refrain from using these words around your children, unless you're ready to be ridiculed by them.

Bad
It's opposite day when it comes to this word. "Bad" means good. Actually "bad" means even better than good. It's often used in reference to someone's appearance.

Bet
"Bet" is used when you're in agreement with something. If someone makes plans and you say "bet," that means you are confirming said plan.

Don't Trip
It's not used as a cautionary "watch out, don't trip." "Don't trip" means don't worry or don't stress about something.

Listen to the doc. If your pediatrician thinks your kid's fever is caused by a virus, don't push for antibiotics. The best medicine may be rest, lots of fluids, and a little TLC. Overprescribing antibiotics can cause medical problems for your child and increase the chances of creating superbugs that resist treatment.

Fam
Technically shortened from the word "family," but it's not used to describe your mom, dad or sister. "Fam" is used to describe people in your life who you're close with: your good friends, your ride or dies, your homies.

Flewed
You'll most likely hear this when someone is bragging about getting "flewed out." It means that someone got flown out (hopefully on an aircraft of some kind) to a place. The word was made popular by Yung Miami of City Girls , and the difference between flown and flewed is that the latter applies to "bad" (read attractive) people .

via GIPHY

Get a bag
A bag refers to money. So to get a bag or even secure a bag means that you are acquiring money.

GOAT
This does not refer to a farm animal. Rather, "GOAT" is an acronym for Greatest of All Time.

Hip
To be hip to something means you know something. When you're hip to the Cardi B and Offset drama, that means you understand what's going on. If someone asks you if you've heard about Colin Kaepernick being blackballed by the NFL, and you say "I'm hip," that means you know.

We got you, fam: Cardi B says she's 'working things out' with estranged husband Offset

No cap: Celebs boycott the Super Bowl in support of Colin Kaepernick

Lit
Contrary to popular belief, lit does not mean to light something on fire. But it does mean that something is fire. For something to be "lit" or "fire," it means that something is great, amazing, exciting, etc.

No cap
Basically means no lie . When someone adds "no cap" to a sentence, it serves as a statement that they're not lying. Can also be used as the converse "cappin,'" which means lying. "Why you cappin'?" is asking someone why they're lying.

Okurrr
A word made popular by pop iconas something that is said to affirm when someone is being put in their place. For example, when Betty says something out of pocket (see below), and Stacy, who normally doesn't say much, tells Betty to quiet down or else, a bystander could say "okurrr."

By acknowledging small improvements in behaviour you make it easier for big improvements to follow.

Out of pocket
To be out of pocket or to say something that's out of pocket means that something is disorderly. If whatever you said is defined as out of pocket, it means that your statement or comment was out of control.

Shade
Shade is usually thrown, meaning you'll most commonly hear it in a sentence like "He threw shade," but it can also be used like "Why are you so shady?" To throw shade means to make an underhanded critical remark toward someone.

via GIPHY

Sis
Sis can be used in multiple ways. If someone asks you what happened and you respond with "Sis," it means there's a whole lot of drama that unfolded and there's a whole lot more to the story. "Sis" can also be used as a term of endearment toward friends or anyone really.

Stan
A stan is a fan. But like a super-obsessed fan.

Tea
There are multiple ways to have your tea. You can sip it, or you can spill it. If you're "sipping your tea," it means that you're minding your own business — basically side-eyeing the situation and keeping it moving. If you're "spilling tea" or "having tea," that means you have some gossip you're about to share.

via GIPHY

Thirsty
No, no it doesn't mean someone is parched. "Thirsty" is used to describe desperation.

Weak
Does not pertain to physical strength. When someone thinks something is funny, hilarious or entertaining, they might say "I'm weak."

Woke
Has nothing to do with sleep — in the literal sense. Being "woke" means to be socially conscious and aware of racial injustices.

Like All the Moms?

Connect with us on .

More: Hey moms-to-be, how about stimulating your unborn's brain with a musical tampon?

More: Kate Hudson clears up 'genderless' parenting approach with daughter Rani Rose

facebook sharetwitter shareemail share

Put on your own oxygen mask first. In other words, take care of yourself or you can't be a fully engaged parent. Parents who deprive themselves of rest, food, and fun for the sake of their kids do no one a favor. "People feel guilty when they work a lot, so they want to give all their free time to their kids," says Fred Stocker, a child psychiatrist at the University of Louisville School of Medicine, in Kentucky. "But you risk getting squeezed dry and emotionally exhausted." A spa weekend may not be realistic, but it's OK to take 15 minutes for a bath after you walk in the door. (A tall request for a kid, yes, but a happier Uno player goes a long way.) Running ragged between activities? Ask your child to prioritize, says Taylor. She may be dying for you to chaperone a field trip but ambivalent about your missing a swim meet—the ideal amount of time for a pedicure.

email shareRead or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/life/allthemoms/2019/02/06/kids-teen-slang-terms-meaning-of-lit-fam-sis-flewed-goat-okurrr-shade-woke-tea-cappin-trip/2767570002/